2- High Tibial Osteotomy

HIGH TIBIAL OSTEOTOMY
High Tibial Osteotomy Introduction

With each step, forces equal to three to eight times your body weight travel between the thigh bone (femur) and shin bone (tibia) in your knee. These forces are dampened by a meniscus on the inner and outer portion of the knee, and the ends of the bones are protected by articular cartilage. Patients with a condition known as osteoarthritis, or degenerative arthritis, experience a successive wearing on the menisci and articular cartilage, which may abrade or develop tears. These degenerative processes limit the ability of the knee to glide smoothly and can result in popping, catching, locking, clicking and pain. In a condition called malalignment, unbalanced forces cause excessive pressure on either in the inner (medial) or outer (lateral) portion of the knee.

Questions For Your Doctor
1. What guidelines should I follow prior to my procedure? Will I need other tests or evaluations before the procedure?
2. Which type of repair will you perform and why is it the appropriate procedure for my condition?
3. What will happen if I don’t undergo the procedure now?
4. How long will the procedure last and will I be under anesthesia?
5. Will I have dressings, bandages, or stitches after surgery? When should they be removed?
6. Will I be given medication after surgery? What tips do you have for me to ease discomfort?
7. How long of a recovery period can I expect, and what kind of help will I need during my recovery? Are there special instructions for eating, sleeping, or bathing?
8. When can I bear full weight on the surgical side after the procedure?
9. When can I return to work, resume normal activity, drive, and exercise?
10. Will I need physical therapy?